Corticosteroid ointment for mouth

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Systemic absorption of topical corticosteroids has produced reversible hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) suppression and/or manifestations of Cushing's syndrome in some patients. Clobetasol propionate has been shown to suppress the HPA axis at doses as low as 2 g/day. Conditions which increase systemic absorption include application of high-potency corticosteroids, use over large surface areas, prolonged use, use in areas where the epidermal barrier is disrupted (., skin abrasion), use in pediatric patients, use in patients with hepatic disease, and the use of an occlusive dressing. Clobetasol propionate preparations should not be used with occlusive dressings. Patients receiving large doses of a potent topical corticosteroid like clobetasol should be evaluated periodically for evidence of HPA axis suppression and manifestations of Cushing's syndrome. If these effects are noted, an attempt should be made to withdraw the drug, to reduce the frequency of application, or to substitute a less potent corticosteroid. Recovery of HPA axis function is generally prompt and complete upon discontinuation. Infrequently, signs and symptoms of withdrawal may occur, requiring supplemental systemic corticosteroids. It is recommended that the administration of clobetasol creams, ointments, gels, or topical solutions be limited to no more than 14 days duration, in order to limit the risk of systemic effects. Clobetasol propionate emollient creams may be administered for up to 4 weeks duration if applied to no more than 5—10% of body surface area. The total weekly dose limit of 50 g or 50 mL of a % preparation should not be exceeded for any clobetasol preparation.

According to the manufacturer, it is not known whether topical administration of flurandrenolide could result in sufficient systemic absorption to produce detectable quantities in breast milk. However, most dermatologists stress that topical corticosteroids can be safely used during lactation and breast-feeding. If applied topically, care should be used to ensure the infant will not come into direct contact with the area of application, such as the breast. Increased blood pressure has been reported in an infant whose mother applied a high potency topical corticosteroid ointment directly to the nipples. Consider the benefits of breast-feeding, the risk of potential infant drug exposure, and the risk of an untreated or inadequately treated condition. If a breast-feeding infant experiences an adverse effect related to a maternally ingested drug, healthcare providers are encouraged to report the adverse effect to the FDA.

Corticosteroid ointment for mouth

corticosteroid ointment for mouth

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